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Origins[edit | edit source]

Proto-Uto-Aztecan is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Uto-Aztecan languages. Authorities on the history of the language group have usually placed the Proto-Uto-Aztecan homeland in the border region between the United States and Mexico, namely the upland regions of Arizona and New Mexico and the adjacent areas of the Mexican states of Sonora and Chihuahua, roughly corresponding to the Sonoran Desert and the western part of the Chihuahuan Desert. It would have been spoken by Mesolithic foragers in Aridoamerica, about 5,000 years ago.

It is also reckoned that that the Azteco-Ute people also originated there and spread out due to natural desificaton thousands of years ago.

The fate of certain tribes has ironically come to typify how divergent the race's history is and the sad fate they faced at the hands of Europeans.

Northern Branch[edit | edit source]

The Nez Perce (/ˌnɛzˈpɜːrs/; autonym: Niimíipuu, meaning "the walking people" or "we, the people") are an Indigenous people of the Plateau who have lived on the  Columbia River Plateau in the Pacific Northwest region for at least 11,500 years.

They had moved north of the original homeland and settled in permanent and temporary villages along the Columbia Plateau. They were persecuted, conquered, ethnically cleansed by the Americans. Later they were impart culturally assimilated and religiously converted by the Americans. After the early 1920s things gradually go better for them and they were finally fully accepted into society in the 1960s.

Northern Paiute /ˈpaɪuːt/, also known as Numu and Paviotso,  had moved north of the original homeland and traditionally lived in the Great Basin region of the United States in what is now eastern California, western Nevada, and southeast Oregon.

Northern Paiutes originally lived a nomadic lifestyle, moving from place to place following animal migration patterns and seasonal foods. They lived in small, independent groups that consisted of a handful or so of different family units.

They co-operated with the Whites, but many died of accidental infections from the Whites.  Later they were impart culturally assimilated and religiously converted by the Americans. After the early 1920s things gradually go better for them and they were finally fully accepted into society in the 1960s.

Central Branch[edit | edit source]

The Hopi are a Native American tribe who primarily live on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona.

They stayed in the home region and lived desert villages like Old Oraibi.

They were persecuted, conquered, ethnically cleansed by the Americans. Later they were impart culturally assimilated and religiously converted by the Americans. After the early 1920s things gradually go better for them and they were finally fully accepted in to society in the 1960s.

The Pima Bajo (Lower Pima or Mountain Pima) people are indigenous people of Mexico who They stayed in the home region and now reside in a mountainous region along the line between the States of Chihuahua and Sonora in northern Mexico. They are related to the Pima and Tohono O’odham of Arizona and northern Sonora, speaking a similar but distinct language

They were a settled down people who converted to the Catholic faith early on by the Spanish and practice many outdated Medieval practices that came with the spanish invaders.

They ere cut off from any more than thire neighbouring villages until the 19th Century and were only connected to the road network in the 1980s.

Tribal elders wish to preserve thire culture and are still were of outsiders.

Southern Branch[edit | edit source]

The Aztecs, self name Culhua-Mexica, are a Nahuatl-speaking people. Nahuatl language, Spanish náhuatl, Nahuatl also spelled Nawatl, also called Aztec, American Indian language of the Uto-Aztecan family, spoken in central and western Mexico. Nahuatl, the most important of the Uto-Aztecan languages, was the language of the Aztec and Toltec civilizations of Mexico.

The Aztec Empire was a confederation of three city-states established in 1427: Tenochtitlan, city-state of the Mexica or Tenochca; Texcoco; and Tlacopan, previously part of the Tepanec empire, whose dominant power was Azcapotzalco

They had moved south, like the Toltecs and others, in to Mexico and were founders of a great civilisations that were later annihilated by the Spanish.

They are now one of the largest native minority groups in Mexico and are now entitled to the same rights as Mexicans. Most of them are now Roman Catholics; but a few are also, godless, protestant or believe in their traditional gods.

The Nahuas of El Salvador (Kuskatan), better known as "Pipiles" in the academic literature, are an indigenous people who live in western El Salvador, which they call Kuskatan. The Pipil language, or Nawat, belongs to the Nahuatl dialect group, which stretches from Durango in Mexico to El Salvador, and historically as far as the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica.

Their cosmography is related to that of the ToltecMayan and Lenca said by oral tradition to have been adopted by the Ch'orti' and Poqomam Mayan people during the Pipil exodus in the 9th century CE, led by Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl. They appear to have splintered of the Toltecs or Aztecs and moved further south to El Salvador. Not much is known about what Spain them, but the natives of the region were either enslaved or annihilated under spanish rule, but things slowly improved after El Salvador's independence from Spain and they were finally fully accepted in to society in the 1990s. Most of them are now Roman Catholics; but a few also believe in their traditional gods.

Modern day fate[edit | edit source]

About 5,500,000 Aztecs in Mexico and Guatemala in the late 2010s and about 1,700,000 of them spoke Nahuatl in the late 2010s.

There are 11,100 Pipils (2005 census), with 500 native speakers of thire language.

As of the 2010 census, there were 18,327 (census 2010), 19,338 (2019 est.) Hopi in the United States of which 6,780 spoke Hopi (2010 census).

There are 2,000-3,000 Pima Bajo (2010) and 650 spoke Pima Bajo (2000).

There are 610 Nez Perce people (2000 census) and 20 (2007) native speakers of thire language.

Thee are 6,000 Northern Paiute and Bannock (1999) and 700 native speakers of thire joint language in 2007.

Sources[edit | edit source]

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  3. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Northern-Paiute
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  14. https://www.southernute-nsn.gov/history/
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  16. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Nahuatl-language
  17. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Aztec
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  19. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico
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  21. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_Empire
  22. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztecs#Population_decline
  23. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico#Ethnicity_and_race
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  30. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_conquest_of_El_Salvador#Colonial_organisation
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  33. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conquistador
  34. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conquest_of_the_Canary_Islands
  35. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conquistador
  36. https://www.ethnologue.com/archive-redirect
  37. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_colonization_of_the_Americas#Demographic_impact
  38. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uto-Aztecan_languages
  39. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pima_Bajo_language
  40. https://www.ethnologue.com/archive-redirect
  41. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pima_Bajo_people
  42. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopi#Hopi-U.S_relations,_1849%E2%80%931946
  43. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pima_Bajo_language
  44. https://glottolog.org/resource/languoid/id/azte1234
  45. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nahuatl
  46. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uto-Aztecan_languages
  47. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopi#Hopi-U.S_relations,_1849%E2%80%931946
  48. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pima_Bajo_people
  49. https://azednews.com/dual-language-programs-grow-in-arizona-public-schools/
  50. https://www.ethnologue.com/archive-redirect
  51. https://archive.vn/20200212212004/https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_AIAN_AIANDP1&prodType=table
  52. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/deeplinks?url=https%3A%2F%2Ffactfinder.census.gov%2Ffaces%2Ftableservices%2Fjsf%2Fpages%2Fproductview.xhtml%3Fpid%3DDEC_10_AIAN_AIANDP1&prodType=table&tid=GOVSTIMESERIES.CG00ORG01
  53. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/
  54. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopi_language
  55. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oraibi,_Arizonhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nez_Perce_people
  56. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nez_Perce_language
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